gears1Shelly Lazarus has picked up a few things in her 35 or so years with ad agency Ogilvy & Mather. So says an article that appeared awhile back in the Economist.

 For one thing, she’s overseen a complete integration of the business. In the very earliest stages of a campaign, TV and radio creative teams sit down with print, billboard, P.R., and Internet marketing pros. That way they can integrate every piece of the message, all at once.

 Sound like a good idea? Sure. But it wasn’t always so. And still isn’t for some companies.

Especially for web marketers, who often get confined too… or sequester themselves to… some part of the project that’s implemented far away from everybody else. And that’s a mistake. It’s the message, not the medium.

 For Ogilvy, the web and interactive campaigns crank out more than half the agencies annual business now, up from only 15% back in 1996. And overall, campaigns are more complex and integrated than ever.

 Lazarus also operates Ogilvy with the idea that it’s better to keep an old client than it is to have to chase down a new one. In agency life, that’s pretty obvious — wooing new clients can take months or years. And can be very expensive.

 But you can learn from this as a freelancer too. It might seem, early on, like piling up as many clients as possible is a shortcut to career security. But the truth is often the opposite. You’re much better off picking up just a few clients and servicing them very, very well.

You’ll understand the products better, you’ll write for them stronger, and you’ll have more controls to show the next time you need to persuade a new client to take on your services.

Here’s one last thing interesting in the Economist piece…

You might or might not know that David Ogilvy himself had huge respect — and experience — in direct response marketing. It turns out Shelly Lazurus, the current top dog, has experience in direct-marketing too. And so does her most likely replacement for when she retires, Brian Fetherestonaugh — he heads up Ogilvy’s direct-marketing division.

 More than just a coincidence? Probably.

 “The ground rules of direct marketing have not really changed,” says Lazarus, “nor have the principles of good advertising.” And that, dear reader, is what we’ve been saying all along.